Summer Academy

The Carnegie Mellon Portugal Summer Academy is a unique event organized by Carnegie Mellon Portugal involving several workshops and talks covering many breakthrough and practical issues on the area of information and communication technologies (ICT). Tailored for an industry audience with hands-on experience in key methods and techniques for service, software and game development, technology change and entrepreneurship. The workshops and talks will be offered by an international team of experts from the Carnegie Mellon faculty and also invited professors from world renown institutions in the ICT field.

Since 2008 M-ITI was leading several workshops on different themes related to HCI, Software Engineering and Service Design, these include:

  • Embodied Futures by Valentina Nisi, Ian Oakley (Summer 2009):
    • A hands-on 2.5 day workshop, which will guide participants through the entire process of designing a novel application for use in public spaces. The workshop will combine Embodied interaction, an emerging paradigm for the design of interactive systems which emphasises action over representation and the “creation, manipulation and sharing of meaning through engaged interaction with artefacts with an accelerated Service Design approach. This involves a three stage project lifecycle including structured processes of discovery, synthesis and construction. This combination of methodologies is well suited to address issues emerging from the increasing incorporation of technology in people’s everyday lives. In this workshop participants will learn how to apply a variety of creative, out-of-the-box style methods at all stages of the design process, from initial fieldwork, to design brainstorming, to prototyping and finally deployment. Professionals from all disciplines, including social science, computer science, interaction design and even management, will have a chance to engage in all parts of a mini-design process as it takes place over the course of 2.5 days, and have a chance to strengthen their skills of being part of an interdisciplinary team. This workshop, at heart, is collaborative, encouraging participants to engage with one another to create and realize novel ideas as a team. Consequently, it is not necessary for participants to be expert anthropologists or professional programmers. Rather, they should have a willingness to explore and communicate, to work together to generate cutting-edge design ideas and prototypes.
  • Service Modeling by Lia Patrício and Nuno Nunes (Summer 2009)
    • Service orientation is at the centre of both business evolution and the e-business revolution. While traditionally service co-production was anchored in human-human interactions, IT is playing a transformative role in how services are conceived, developed, and delivered. Service industries now account for the majority of economic activity in developed countries. Today we live and work in the newly labelled Service Economy. A new service-centered paradigm has emerged that is changing the way services are conceptualized and managed. The new service-centered paradigm advocates that value is co-created by customers through product usage or service interaction experience, in a relational exchange. Instead of delivering pre-produced offerings, firms must now offer value propositions, which customers then transform into value through usage. In this context, service experiences, viewed as “the outcomes of the interactions between organizations, related systems/processes, service employees and customers”, become increasingly important to differentiate and add value to firms offerings. In this workshop participants will learn how to translate their findings about user and business needs into an integrative set of models that systematize the understanding of user activities and tasks, and provide the basis for the development of a set of models that supports service system design. Participants will learn how to translate requirements into service modeling, including customer experience and other non-functional requirements. These models can be jointly used by software developers and service designers to develop new and high-quality services. Professionals from all disciplines, including social science, computer science, interaction design and even management, will have a chance to engage in all parts of a mini-design process as it takes place over the course of 2.5 days, and have a chance to strengthen their skills of being part of an interdisciplinary team.
  • Interaction Design for non-designers by Larry Constantine and Monchu Chen (Summer 2009)
    • Usability and user experience are widely recognized as critical for the success of software and Web-based applications. Interaction design is the gateway to usability, but not every project has full-time access to interaction designers or usability specialists. This workshop by two experienced practicing designers introduces core principles and basic practices for guiding effective interaction design. These simple proven and practical approaches can help non-designers of all kinds—software architects, software engineers, analysts and developers—make sound decisions that will enhance usability and improve the user experience. Participants will learn from discussion, examples, and hands-on practice how to improve function visibility, how to provide better user feedback, how to structure user interfaces for faster learning and increased user performance, and how to design more flexible and forgiving user interaction. They will learn how to understand the activities in which their users are involved and to organize the user interface to better support performance of those activities.