Overview of courses at Madeira-ITI

The list below shows, in alphabetical order, the courses taught to the Human-Computer Interaction. Click on a course title for further information.

3D design
3D modelling
Rendering
Lighting simulation
Cinematography
7.5 ECTS
UMa
Spring
MHCI
MEI
PAHT
Others
Sergi Bermudez
The syllabus was created to make sure the objectives of this unit could be achieved and properly developed throughout the semester. The course starts with the basic geometric modeling methods, using CSG, boolean operations, and various types of geometric modifications. This content provides students with the Basic skills to design basic geometric models, which will be later improved using mesh modeling and modifications at sub-object level to model organic shapes. Texture design and texture mapping are studied as well as basic lighting and camera techniques, which enable students to perform camera movements and object animation to create cinematic sequences.
 
This curricular unit is evaluated through a series of models, renderings, and animations created by students individually, and through an individually written reflection report at the end.
 
Please click to see the Syllabus.
7.5 ECTS
M-ITI
Spring
MHCI
PDMD
NETSyS
 
The aim of this course is to give students direct contact with the recent technologies and techniques, addressing a broad range of research topics in the areas of software engineering, human-computer interaction, artificial intelligence, information and multimedia systems.
 
The proposed activities and the invited lecturers are chosen to give students direct contact with the recent technologies and techniques from the areas of study that are relevant for the degrees where this course is taught.
 
This course is composed of several workshops (mini-courses) that can be credit as one full course if the student successfully completes 2 workshops.

 

The options available for Spring 2017 are:

 - Prototype™ by Chris Csikszentmihályi, James Auger, Victor Azevedo, and Vitor Aguiar (Dates: 23 January to 3 February)

 - The Power of Spatial Data by Johannes Schöning (Dates: 13 February to 24 February) 

 - Information Visualization by Robert Spence (Dates: 06 March to 17 March)

 

Please take into consideration that if you want to get credit for the workshops (2 workshops = 1 full course) you must enroll in 2 workshops selecting the "for credit" options.

The final grade that you will get for Advanced Topics in Informatics will be the average score of the 2 workshops that you did for credit.

You can also attend any of the workshops not for credit. In this case you will not receive a grade and it will not appear on your transcript. 

 

creative
writing
fiction
digital media
7.5 ECTS
UMa
Fall
MHCI
MEI
MET
PAHT
Julian Hanna
 
This course is designed to help students develop skills as creative writers in a variety of forms, including short fiction, creative nonfiction, and newer digital media forms. The emphasis in this course will be on learning through experimentation: experimentation with writing style, voice, tone, genre, and so on. The readings for this course will reflect this experimental focus, being drawn from a broad cross-section of fiction and nonfiction, poetry, journalism, and other forms.
 
Most classes will take the form of a writing workshop: that is, students will read and critique their colleagues’ work and receive feedback on their own work in turn. There will also be lectures covering a range of topics such as narrative, character, voice, and writing for particular communities / in specific genres. Assignments will include in-class and take-home assignments (e.g. flash fiction exercises and longer stories), and presenting on aspects of the writing process.
 
User study
Interface and interaction design
Iterative design cycle
Rapid prototyping
7.5 ECTS
UMa
Fall
MHCI
MEI
MET
Others
Nuno Correia

Students work as teams to finish a semester-long HCI project where they go through several design, implementation and evaluation cycles.  Each team will develop a product/service to solve a given design problem.  Students are strongly encouraged to submit their work to international design competitions, such as the one at the CHI conference.

At the beginning of the semester, each student has to propose a design direction/plan/solution for a targeted design problem. Students who win the proposal competition will recruit other students and control the schedule created to execute the project plan. Each team needs to meet the instructor for individual work sessions, and to present their progress to the class. At the end of the semester, there will be a public presentation and prototype demonstration.

Please click to print the Syllabus.

Phenomenology
Tangible computing
Social computing
Sensing
7.5 ECTS
UMa
Fall
MHCI
MEI
Diogo Cabral
This course is concerned with humans as embodied actors interacting in the world in the absorbed and unreflective manner of everyday experience. This standpoint is of particular relevance to emerging HCI disciplines of tangible computing and social computing. The goal of this approach is to create interaction experiences for users which are seamlessly intertwined with the surrounding physical and social environment. This course will provide the theoretical background to embodied interaction, explore the domains in which its model is applicable and provide practical experience with the fundamentals of constructing such systems. It culminates with a substantial project exploring sensors and interaction.
 
Please click to see the Syllabus.
Playtesting
Technology
Interactive Stories
7.5 ECTS
UMa
Fall
MHCI
MEI
MET
PAHT
Others
Sergi Bermudez
The goal of this curricular unit is to prepare students for a career that involves the development of computer games and other interactive experiences. Students in this curricular unit will read and write about game design and develop their own games. This is not to be confused with a computer games development course.
The course focuses on the rules and methods for the design of the game, that remain relatively constant regardless of the technology used to develop a game. While technology plays an important role in our studies, technical details will not be our focus. The student will study and design all types of games: card games, dice games, sports games, history, and yes, even video games. How to design games, project them as well, and how to track their projects to completion it's whar the student will be studying.
The syllabus for this curricular unit was selected to make sure the objectives could be achieved and properly developed throughout the semester. The course starts with introductory aspects and the history of traditional games and computer games, and then aspects such as technology, narrative, aesthetics, and game mechanics are dealt with in more detail. These chapters set the foundations of the skills and motivation for the rest of the course. The remaining chapters address techniques for effective game development. The development process, the psychological aspects of the player, and ethics are transversal concepts that are also explored during the course.
 
Please click to see the Syllabus.
22.5 ECTS
M-ITI
Fall
Spring
MHCI
Simone Ashby
Valentina Nisi

The capstone project integrates all the skills and knowledge acquired during the professional master in a unique end-to-end experience of development of a prototype for an interactive system or service from a problem definition provided by an industry sponsor. Students learn to work in interdisciplinary groups, integrating conflict and team management skills with perspectives from design, psychology and computer science. The course consolidates the development of project and documentation management skills, communication with clients, and preparation of multimedia contents for concept validation. Project focuses on the following technical skills: concept ideation and generation, interative prototyping, and the development of interactive software-based systems and services.

Please click to print the Syllabus.

Cognitive psychology
Perceptual psychology
Accident analysis
Case studies
7.5 ECTS
UMa
Fall
MHCI
MEI
PAHT
Others
Nuno Correia
This course is designed to: 
1.To introduce students to theoretical aspects of human factors, cognitive science, and social science that will assist them in understanding and designing the interactions of humans with the world, tools and technology.
2. To assist students investigate and understand problems that arise out of the interaction of humans with systems; 
3. To introduce students to methods and principles for analyzing problems that involve human factors, such as: perception, cognition, decision making and human errors; 
4. To introduce students to physical and cognitive ergonomics; 
5. To teach students to consider human factors for technology design; 
6 To teach students to understand problems and apply human factors knowledge to analyze them, find sources of error, and propose the design (or redesign) of systems in order to improve human system interactions.
 
Please click to see the Syllabus.
Activity modeling
Model-driven inquiry and design
User and task modeling
User interface architecture
Abstract prototyping
Modeling tools and languages for interaction design
7.5 ECTS
UMa
Fall
MHCI
MEI
MET
Others
Nuno Nunes

This course discusses the fundamentals of human-centered software engineering an emerging discipline that focuses on bridging SE and HCI in an attempt to solve the outstanding problems of modern software development. Students are introduced to the main methods and techniques of HCSE through the comprehensive activity-based design method pioneered by Larry Constantine.

SE and HCI processes; Activity modeling; Model-driven inquiry; User modeling; Model-driven architecture; Abstract prototyping; Instructive interaction; Model-driven inspections.

Please click to see the Syllabus.

7.5 ECTS
M-ITI
Fall
Spring
MHCI
MET
Simone Ashby
Independent Study is a full semester course.
 
An Independent Study course is one that is designed by the student to pursue in-depth study in a particular area of interest. Independent study courses are worth 7.5 units. Each independent study, regardless of the proposed units, fulfills the requirement of one elective course only. 
The purpose of the independent study is for you to further explore an area of interest you may have just scratched the surface of during one of the core courses.
While the independent study is intended for individual students, it may be completed in very small teams. All members of the team must have completed the core courses. A team project must be more significant in scope than a project by an individual.

Please click to see the Syllabus.

3.7 ECTS
M-ITI
Spring
MHCI
MEI
MET
Robert Spence
To instill, in the student:
 
• An awareness of the potential offered by information visualization.
• A familiarity with the underlying concepts of information visualization, achieved via a series of design exercises.
• An ability to assess whether information visualization is relevant to your personal and professional interests.
• An ability to make some immediate use of the techniques discussed.
• An ability to assess both the benefits and shortcomings of available software products involving information visualization.
Interaction design
User needs study
Usage scenarios
Ideation
Concept validation
Rapid prototyping
Video sketching
7.5 ECTS
UMa
Spring
MHCI
MEI
MET
Others

An interface provides the framework, elements, and resources for a “conversation” to take place between (i) people and people, (ii) people and places, and (iii) people and products. An interface should subtly convey an expectation of what the product can do and provide feedback on actions taken.
Interaction designers invent interfaces and define product behavior. Through a process of (i) exploring the needs and desires of users, (ii) the social and functional aspects of context, and (iii) agendas of relevant stakeholders, interaction designers frame a problem through a solution that defines what a product is, what it does, and how it works. Through this integrative process, designers invent what might be, addressing the problem in order to transition the world from its current state to a “preferred” state.
In this course we will explore the fundamentals of interfaces and the interaction design process. This course means to fulfill the following requirements:

  1. Introduce and practice the fundamental concepts, methods, and practices of interaction design.
  2. Explore the ideas of “form follows interaction” and “be the user”.
  3. Explore how users develop attachment with products through identification.
  4. Explore the role that interaction with products plays in mediating relationships between people and people, people and places, and people and products.
  5. Improve student’s ability to present their design ideas.

This is mostly a studio class. There will be few theoretical lectures; students will work on a series of design assignments and are expected to actively participate in exercises and peer evaluations.
The assignments are mostly group work and results will be critiqued in class throughout the course.

Please click to see the Syllabus.

7.5 ECTS
UMa
Fall
MHCI
MEI
Others
David Aveiro

1. Introduction to Organizational Engineering discipline: the context of Information Systems Engineering and Organization Science;

2. Fundamental theoretical notions: ontology, semiotics, system and model;

3. State-of-the-art of methods and modeling notations;

4. Introduction to DEMO (Design and Engineering Methodology for Organizations);

5. DEMO Axioms and Theorem;

6. DEMO methodology;

7. Mission, strategy and organization architecture;

8. Organization control;

9. Organizational change: the Generation, Operationalization and Discontinuation of organization artifacts

Usability engineering
Prototyping
Interaction techniques
Interface design
7.5 ECTS
M-ITI
Spring
MHCI
Pedro Campos

This course is a combination programming course and design studio, and is for those who wish to express their interactive ideas in working prototypes. Students will learn how to use programming languages, how to design and implement effective GUI interfaces, and how to perform rapid, effective iterative user tests. They will also explore advanced interaction and interface techniques. The course will cover usability

testing of interactive prototypes. It will also cover important subjects related to distribution of software products, selling in determinate vs. indeterminate markets, case studies and context-aware apps.

This course is intended for HCII Masters students who come to CMU with a minimal, but competent programming background. It is also appropriate for CMU HCI undergraduate "second majors" in HCII who have had an introductory programming course. Class attendance is mandatory. The students taking this course will often not be professional programmers, but will probably need to interact with programmers, and need to:

• Learn to express yourself in executable form

• Learn the basics of what is hard and easy to rapidly prototype

• Learn the basic terminology and approaches used by programmers, so you can work with them

• Experience the frustration and joy of programming a working prototype

• Design and conduct informal user tests of prototypes to find flaws with your interfaces

This is a six-hour credit course (6 hours of work are expected outside of class). Online resources for the class are provided on UMa’s Moodle platform (password will be given in the first class).

Prerequisites

Proficiency in a programming language such as C, programming methodology and style, problem analysis, program structure, algorithm analysis, data abstraction, and dynamic data. Normally met through an introductory course in programming in C, C++, Pascal or JAVA, such as: 15100 or 15112 or 15127 or equivalent. Pragmatically, the requirement can be defined as “can successfully write a 300 line program in a 48 hour period.”

• Learn the basics of what is hard and easy to rapidly prototype
• Learn the basic terminology and approaches used by programmers, so you can
work with them
• Experience the frustration and joy of programming a working prototype
• Design and conduct informal user tests of prototypes to find flaws with your
interfaces
Instructor
Pedro Campos |
Class meetings:
Tuesdays/Fridays, 11:00 – 13:00
M-ITI Room #9
Office hours: Mondays 10:00 – 11:00
Other hours: by appointment or by IM
This is a six-hour credit course (6 hours of work are expected outside of class). Online
resources for the class are provided on UMa’s Moodle platform (password will be given
in the first class).
3.8 ECTS
M-ITI
Spring
MHCI
MEI
PDMD
Chris Csikszent...
James Auger
Victor Azevedo
Vitor Aguiar

Prototype™

Instructors: Chris Csikszentmihályi, James Auger, Victor Azevedo, Vitor Aguiar

Prototype™ is a two week introduction to making things. It is meant as a crash course (sometimes literally) in shop and laboratory skills, from cutting wood to welding metal, etching circuits to using machine tools. No prior experience is necessary (though we will ask prospective students to fill out a long form describing their previous experiences so that we can adjust assignments accordingly).

In the academic fields that make things -- science, engineering, design, and art -- being able to turn an idea into a thing is a critical skill, allowing the proof of a hypothesis, demonstration of a finding, or embodiment of an idea. Building the world can be a way of knowing, not only proving, and even a way of choosing how to live. Experimental physicists design 27km long machines to detect something that weighs .0000000000000002kg, while artist Yayoi Kusama designs patterned environments where she can camouflage herself, and designer Jae Rhim Lee builds mushroom suits to safely compost corpses. All these diverse activities rely on surprisingly similar processes of material manipulation that have deep roots in human culture -- a dense and varied set of histories -- but are at the same time immediate and a source of pleasure and satisfaction (or drudgery and exploitation) to many people.  

The Prototype™ class will introduce students to the practical process of designing and building both "looks-like" and "works-like" prototypes and research equipment. Terms such as shear, tolerance, successive approximation, durometer, mortise and tenon, FeCl3, and NURB will become clear (if they aren't already), and students will gain exposure to most of the tools in the Critical Technical Practice shop. While most students will not come out of the class able to make anything well, they will almost be able to make anything, and well on their way to knowing how.

 

Week 1:

Measuring, Analog to Digital

Strength and Other Material Properties, Loading, Statics, Dynamics

Cutting, Joining, Gluing, Welding

Drilling, Tapping, Fastening, Machining

3D & Design for Manufacture

 

Week 2:

Sewing, Fiber, Casting

IO, sensing, actuation, ICs and electricity

Circuit design and soldering

Conclusion, 24 hour project

Final presentations 

Experience design
Interaction design
7.5 ECTS
UMa
Spring
MHCI
MEI
MET
Others
Valentina Nisi

The Service Design course is a 14-week long course for the Masters in MEI, HCI and ETC programs that explain the basics of service design and engages the students in working on service design briefs that tackle real life problems and opportunities. Students work in interdisciplinary teams to produce a service concept and requirements document for a new or enhanced Computer enabled service, or product/service system. The students come from a variety of backgrounds including computer science, psychology, art, design, multimedia, and other related programs. Based on that understanding, students go through an innovation phase producing product ideas situated to meet the identified needs. Students should plan to produce models, concepts  and experience prototypes so that they can get meaningful feedback from their Mentor or clients in a timely fashion. Weekly studio sessions, insure students research, synthesis and created meaningful solutions, refinements to their concept adapt it to user needs. For this course the end goal is to expose and train the students to the basic SD processes and models. In order to do that we engage teams of student to work on a brief at the time for the total of two completed projects. The results will be a submission to a selected SD competition and a complete documentation of both the briefs procesess, through a series of refined SD Models  and a final communication video for the last brief service concept.

Online communities
Regulating behaviour
Privacy
Online games
Mashups
7.5 ECTS
UMa
Fall
MHCI
MEI
MET
Others
Mary Barreto
This course is designed to
- Introduce students to the theoretical aspects of how online communities operate
- Help students identify those characteristics that make social websites succeed or fail
- Research selected topics in social web;
- Develop students' critical thinking and writing, and presentation skills.

Software architectures
7.5 ECTS
UMa
Spring
MHCI
MEI
MET
Others
Leonel Nóbrega

Architectures for Software Systems aim to teach you how to design, understand and evaluate systems at an architectural level of abstraction. By the end of the course you should be able to:

  • Recognize major architectural styles in existing software systems;
  • Describe an architecture accurately;
  • Generate architectural alternatives for a problem and choose among them;
  • Construct a medium-sized software system that satisfies an architectural specification;
  • Use existing definitions and development tools to expedite such tasks;
  • Understand the formal definition of a number of architectures and be able to reason precisely about the properties of those architectures;
  • Use domain knowledge to specialize an architecture for a particular family of applications.
Advanced UI programming
Interaction techniques
7.5 ECTS
UMa
Spring
MHCI
MEI
PDMD
NETSyS
Diogo Cabral

This course is designed to:

  • Introduce students to the basic organizing principles found in interactive software
  • Provide experience with user interface implementation
  • Explore advanced interaction techniques

This course is intended for those with advanced programming skills (CS background) who want to do serious development of graphical user interfaces. It considers factors of input, output, application interface, and related infrastructure as well as the typical patterns used to implement them. It will also consider how these components are organized and managed within a well-structured object oriented system. After considering these fundamental concepts in the first portion of the class, the later part will consider advanced topics related to emerging future concepts in user interface design.

This course includes: an introduction to task analysis and functional design of the user interface; basic principles of computer graphics used in UI implementation; event handling and event dispatching models; screen update algorithms and multi-view architectures; input syntax formalisms and their transformation into programs; interactive geometry; architectures for advanced features such as cut/copy/paste, macros and groupware.

The course also includes an intensive programming lab on mobile interfaces (Android).

Ubiquitous computing
Context-awareness
Sensing
Security
Privacy
Smart homes
7.5 ECTS
UMa
Spring
MHCI
MEI
Karolina Baras
1. Introduction 
2. Tips on reading and writing skills 
3. Ubiquitous computing Vision 
4. Ubiquitous computing challenges 
5. Methods and tools
6. Context-awareness 
7. Sensors and tags 
8. Privacy and security
9. Applications: smart home, urban computing, healthcare, wearable computing, social and mobile software, games, hostile environments, automotive pervasive computing.
 
Lectures, including presentations and dialogue inside and outside the classroom, based on scientific papers offer a direct contact with the ubiquitous computing area. Research, dialogue, presentations and team works foster the development of critical thinking, communication and teamwork. Project allows for additional development of these skills and also for a deeper insight to existing ubiquitous systems and/or the implementation of such a system.
Spatial Computing
Volunteered Geographic Information
VGI
3.8 ECTS
M-ITI
Spring
MHCI
MEI
Others
Johannes Schoening
Happening on 13th to 17th and 20th to 24th of February 2017 From 4:00 - 7:00
 

What is special about spatial data?

What is the role of spatial computing and volunteered geographic information in human-computer interaction?

Abstract:

In more and more scientific disciplines spatial information plays an important role. For example, volunteered geographic information (VGI), in the form of geotagged tweets or other forms of social media VGI, are becoming increasingly critical to many applications and scientific studies. An important assumption underlying much of this research is that social media VGI is “local”, or that its geotags correspond closely with the general home locations of its contributors.

Starting from this assumption, I will highlight several important areas within the special computing domain through different case studies and projects. The course will cover important topics ranging from the characteristic of volunteered geographic information, mobile guides, the creation of interactive maps, to different positing systems.

This theoretical part is completed with a hand-on session on building a “spatial sensor”. We will build a logging device to log environmental data using sensors for climate (weather, air quality), transport (traffic density or noise pollution) and many more phenomena. Basic scripting skills are useful for the second part of the class.